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PROBA2 Eclipse Observations - 21-Aug-2017

Figure 1. SWAP eclipse image sequence from the first passage of the 2017 August 21 eclipse.

UPDATE: The SWAP images are received from the satellite. Check out the pictures and movies below. 

Monday, 21 August 2017 has marked an important celestial event, a total solar eclipse. This was a well observed event, as the eclipse transited the whole of North America. The path of the eclipse can be seen here. People along the path saw a total eclipse, and those outside this path witnessed a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun's disk. The eclipse was visible for about two and a half minutes from any location along the path of totality, and first seen on the west coast of the USA in Oregon at around 10:19 am PDT and finally in South Carolina at around 02:44 p.m EDT (more timing information can be found here). For more information on other types of eclipses, visit here.

Automated SWAP Carrington Rotation Movies Online - Now with daily updates!

Mini Carrington Rotation ImageThe PROBA2 team is proud to present fully automated and daily updated Carrington rotation movies. A Carrington Rotation is a period of time chosen to represent one rotation of the Sun, allowing the comparison of features such as sunspot groups or active regions (a description of active regions can be found here). A period of 27.28 days was chosen to represent a single rotation that largely resembles the recurrence time of features near the equator.
 
The rotation period was initially conceived by Richard Carrington, when he determined the rotation rate of low latitude sunspots. Carrington determined a rotation rate of 25.38 days relative to background stars (sidereal rotation period). However, due to the Earths orbit, this is perceived as 27.28 days from the Earth. Each rotation of the Sun is assigned a Carrington Rotation Number, starting from 09-Nov-1853. That number has now reached 2194 at time of writing (13-Jun-2017); More information can be found here.

The first solar eclipse of 2017

On February 26th, lucky observers along the eclipse path in Chile, Argentina, Angola, Zambia and The Democratic Republic of the Congo have been able to witness an annular eclipse.

SWAP Calibration Campaign between 2017-Jan-11 00:00 UT and 2017-Jan-12 11:30 UT

We inform all PROBA2 data users that there will be no regular science data from SWAP between about 2017-Jan-11 00:00 UT and 2017-Jan-12 11:30 UT due to a special SWAP calibration campaign. LYRA data may sporadically be available during the campaign. However, we warn our users not to count on the availability of data from either of the sun-observing PROBA2 instruments during Wednesday and Thursday morning of this week.
 

PROBA2 Science Working Team Meeting 14

The PROBA2 team is pleased to announce the 14th PROBA2 Science Working Team (SWT) meeting, which will be held on Wednesday November 16, 2016 from 13:15 to 14:45 central european time at the European Space Weather Week. The meeting will be held in the Mercator room, where a small lunch is being offered.
 

Another eclipse!

We received the first data from LYRA and SWAP! Find all images and movies here. - Following the partial solar eclipse in March and the Mercury transit in May, there is one more celestial event in the making this year.

PROBA2 Science Working Team Meeting 13

SWAPUpdate: With exciting science talks and participation from all around the globe, SWT13 was a success. A big thank-you to all who contributed! Meeting notes can be found here.

PROBA2 Guest Investigator 7th Call Results

We are pleased to announce that the PROBA2 Science Working Team has selected 8 proposals for the 2016 Guest Investigator Program.

Mercury Transit

Mercury Image courtesy of ESACelestial transits-where a celestial body is seen to pass across the solar disk from the perspective of the Earth-are relatively rare events. The planet Mercury undergoes around 13 transits a century, and Venus has a pair of transits approximately every 120 years. In 2012 the SWAP EUV imager on the PROBA2 satellite successfully observed a Venus transit of the Sun. On May 9, 2016, it was Mercury's turn! The Mercury transit was seen from Earth starting at 11:13 UT and ending at 18:42 UT. The total transit time was around 7 hours and 30 minutes.

 

What did we expect to see in SWAP observations? SWAP is an EUV telescope onboard the ESA PROBA2 satelite, it observes the Sun at roughly 1 million degrees from orbit around the Earth. Mercury is expected to be pictured as a small black disk crossing the face of the Sun, which would be seen as roughly 4 pixels in diameter. The PROBA2 team created a simulation of what SWAP was expected to see, which is shown in the video below. This simulation illustrates the path of Mercury as it crosses the Sun from the perspective of SWAP on PROBA2. The path of Mercury appears to 'wobble' as it crosses the Sun, but this is an artificial effect created by parallax from the changing perspective of Mercury in the PROBA2 field-of-view as the spacecraft orbits the Earth.

Seventh Call for PROBA2 Guest Investigator Program - Deadline Extended

Due to a recent surge in interest in the PROBA2 Guest Investigator program the proposal submission deadline has been extended to 2016-April-01. Those who have already submitted a proposal may re-submit their proposal if they wish to work on them more.
 

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